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Worldview and the Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) are now offering near real-time true/natural color (RGB) and infrared color (NGB) imagery from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) instrument on the Terra satellite. The imagery are available for the nadir, four fore and four aft views provided by MISR's nine cameras.

That's looking at the earth from 9 different angles in two different band combinations - a total of 18 imagery products!

The true/natural color imagery use the Red-Green-Blue (RGB) band wavelength combination to produce images that is similar to what the human eye would see, providing natural-looking images of land surface, oceanic and atmospheric features. The infrared color imagery uses the Near Infrared-Green-Blue (NGB) band wavelength combination to produce images that make it easier to differentiate between types of vegetation and shows vegetation in red, it's also good for identifying surface water.

The spatial resolution of the natural color imagery is 250m. Imagery for the infrared color radiance is at 1 km for the eight off-nadir views and 250m for the nadir view.

The imagery is produced from the MISR Level 1 ellipsoid-projected radiance data products by NASA’s Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) MISR Element at NASA’s Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC). These products are generally accessible within two to three hours of a satellite overpass, and are available for viewing through NASA’s Worldview or similar GIBS client systems. Imagery for these products is available from 1 September 2017 to present.

While LANCE near real-time products are not intended to take the place of data products generated by the detailed processing necessary for scientific research, they are an invaluable resource for users needing rapid, continually updated views of ongoing Earth processes.

MISR A Nadir, Infrared color (Color Radiance (An, NGB)) image of the Nile River Delta on the 23rd September 2017.

Download the corresponding data in Worldview!

 

Hurricane Irma on the 7th of September 2017. This animation shows the storm from different angles as imaged by MISR's 9 cameras, in the following order: Df, Cf, Bf, Af, An, Aa, Ba, Ca, Da  - viewing forward, downward, and backward along the Terra satellite flight path (overlaid on MODIS/Terra imagery).

More and more imagery!

GIBS and Worldview are constantly adding new imagery! Here is a list of our most recent additions:

The following layers have now been forward processed to the present day/end of most recent month (and will continue to be forward processed): 

The following layers have been forward processed to May 2017 (and will continue to be forward processed) 

The following layers have been forward processed to April 2017 (and will continue to be forward processed)


Land Surface Reflectance, 28 August 2009 (MODIS/Terra)

Daily Mean Lightning Flash Rate, 23 August 2013 (TRMM/LIS)

Learn more about the imagery

We've made some improvements and now you can find the layer descriptions anytime you bring up a layer. In the past, the descriptions were fairly difficult to find.

Whether you're scrolling through the categories, doing a search in the Layer Picker or even once you've loaded the layer into the Layer List, the descriptions are there!

Share with your friends

When you've found an awesome image in Worldview, you can now share the URL with your friends in Facebook, Twitter (#NASAWorldview), Reddit and via email. Just click on the share icon in the top right corner of Worldview.

Find out when something's gone awry (or when something awesome has been added to Worldview!)

Worldview's incorporated a notification system so that you will be notified within Worldview if imagery delivery has been delayed or system maintenance is in progress. You might even find out if a new and exciting feature has been added to Worldview!

 

Coming soon...

We're always working on improving Worldview and cooking up the next new feature(s)! Currently, were working on improving our search function and improving the browse and interaction with the Events feed. Check out our new Roadmap to see what our near-, mid- and long-term goals are and what we're prioritizing to work on next!

New Imagery in GIBS and Worldview

GIBS and Worldview continues to expand their offerings of imagery - we have incorporated a whole bunch of new imagery for you to use and interact with!

 

New imagery available in GIBS and Worldview

Daily

  • MODIS Normalized Snow Difference Index and Ice Surface Temperature
  • SMAP Enhanced versions of Passive Brightness Temperature and Passive Soil Moisture, Freeze/Thaw
  • AMSR2 Soil Moisture Normalized Polarization Difference (day and night)
  • AMSR2 Soil Moisture Single Channel Algorithm (day and night)
  • MOPITT Carbon Monoxide

Monthly

  • Precipitable Water over Ice-Free Oceans and Wind Speed over Ice-Free Oceans (RSS)
  • MISR Aerosol Optical Depth, Cloud Stereo Height, Directional Hemispherical Reflectance, NDVI, Radiance, and Albedo
  • OMI Standard layers including Sulfur Dioxide (Planetary Boundary layer), Aerosol Optical Depth (388 nm, Multi-Wavelength), Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo 388 nm, Near-UV), Ozone (DOAS), Ozone (TOMS-line) Nitric Oxide (Tropospheric Column)
  • CERES Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA Flux, Surface Flux and Incoming Solar Flux)
  • Web Enabled Landsat Data (WELD) Corrected Reflectance for Alaska, Conterminous US and Global and NDVI
  • MOPITT Carbon Monoxide

Other time periods

  • Annual and Seasonal Web Enabled Landsat Data (WELD) Corrected Reflectance for Alaska, Conterminous US and Global and NDVI
  • VIIRS Black Marble Nighttime Lights 2012 and 2016
  • Daymet Minimum and Maximum Air Temperature
  • TRMM Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and OrbView-1 OTD Lightning Flashes and Lightning Flash Rate

Polar layers

  • SSMI Sea Ice Concentration Daily
  • MEaSUREs Ice Velocity for Greenland and Antarctica Daily
  • SSMIS Sea Ice Concentration and Snow Extent Daily
  • MODIS and VIIRS fires can now be displayed in the Arctic view
New imagery available in GIBS (soon to be in Worldview)
  • Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Speed
  • MODIS Sea Surface Temperature
  • Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform Wind Speed

Worldview 1.4.0 release - New features galore!

Worldview has incorporated some exciting new features to help you explore the planet! In addition to the features mentioned below, we have also included an auto-disable function which prevents a layer from being turned on if there is no imagery available for that date.

Continuous view of the Pacific Ocean

Imagery layers like the MODIS or VIIRS Corrected Reflectance and some other daytime layers can now be viewed over the dateline/antimeridian for the day prior to and after the current date displayed. This allows for an unbroken view of the Pacific Ocean as observed by the satellites. 

It is now possible to view the Pacific Ocean in a continuous, unbroken view in Worldview. Imagery to the left of the dateline/antimeridian displays April 14 while the imagery to the right of the dateline/antimeridian is April 13.

Fiji is an archipelagic country comprised of 300+ islands. Worldview’s new feature allows you to view the entire country since imagery is now displayed across the dateline/antimeridian. Imagery on the left is for April 9 and imagery on the right is for April 8.

Find the information that you’re interested in

Users can now view the data value under the cursor in the respective layer's legend/color bar for relevant discrete/continuous data visualization layers.

Hover over any location on a layer with a legend/color bar. You will be able to see the corresponding value to that color in the legend. Hovering over the location off the coast of West Africa, where a dust storm is occurring shows an Aerosol Optical Depth of 0.695 – 0.7.

Close up of the legend showing the corresponding image data value.

Updates to the Natural Events Feed – Easier to find events and distinguish between events

A marker or bounding box has been added to illustrate an event’s location shown in the Events feed.

Marker showing the location of Tropical Storm Maarutha on April 15, 2017

Bounding box showing the location of the Parliament Fire in Florida on March 21, 2017

Icons have been added to differentiate between natural event categories in the Events feed.

Natural events icons – Many thanks to our newest contributor, CodeMacabre, for developing these beautiful icons!

 

VIIRS Outage - RESOLVED

Update 2017/03/23 20:10 UTC: this issue has been resolved between GIBS and the data provider, VIIRS imagery should now be up to date and being processed.  Please report any problems to support@earthdata.nasa.gov and thanks for your patience!


VIIRS near real-time products and some MODIS near real-time atmosphere products have been unavailable in GIBS since March 20, 2017 due to operating system upgrades on the imagery provider's web site.

We are working with the provider to resolve the issues. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Based on directives from the US Department of Homeland Security, we are required to transition our public-facing web services to use the HTTPS protocol and deprecate support for HTTP.  

All of our production web services currently support both HTTP and HTTPS, though beginning on March 13, 2017, any HTTP requests will return a “301 Moved Permanently” response code which most browsers will automatically redirect to use HTTPS.  Hopefully this transition will be seamless to most of you - please see here if any action is needed on your part:


Tool / LibraryImpact
Worldview usersUnaffected as it already uses HTTPS to retrieve GIBS imagery
OpenLayers / Leaflet / Cesium mapping librariesWill automatically redirect GIBS requests to HTTPS although this may incur extra network traffic during initial HTTP exchanges
Script-based access using GDALWill automatically redirect GIBS requests to HTTPS although this may incur extra network traffic during initial HTTP exchanges
Your custom mapping appUnknown!  Please see below for ways to test and upgrade

 

For most developers, this update should involve simply changing the GIBS service endpoint from http to https.  Here is a sample of previous endpoints for HTTP-based “geographic” tile requests:

http://map1.vis.earthdata.nasa.gov/wmts-geo/  (circa 2011-2016)

http://gibs.earthdata.nasa.gov/wmts/epsg4326/best/  (2016+)

 

These URLs should now be replaced by their HTTPS equivalent, e.g:

https://gibs.earthdata.nasa.gov/wmts/epsg4326/best/  (2016+)

 

See here for our full API documentation:

https://wiki.earthdata.nasa.gov/display/GIBS/GIBS+API+for+Developers

 

If you would like to test how your HTTP-based application will respond to the HTTP 301 redirect before the transition on March 13, 2017, you can use our User Acceptance Testing (UAT) environment which already has the redirect in place:

http://uat.gibs.earthdata.nasa.gov/wmts/epsg4326/best/

 

Please contact us at support@earthdata.nasa.gov if you have any questions or concerns.

We are excited to announce the VIIRS Nighttime Imagery (Day/Night Band, Enhanced Near Constant Contrast) layer has been added to GIBS and Worldview!

This imagery shows the earth’s surface and atmosphere using a sensor designed to capture low-light emission sources, under varying illumination conditions. It is displayed as a grey-scale image. Sources of illumination include both natural and anthropogenic sources of light emissions. Lunar reflection can be used to highlight the location and features of clouds and other terrestrial features such as sea ice and snow cover when there is partial to full moon conditions. When there is no moonlight, natural and anthropogenic night time light emissions are highlighted such as city lights, lightning, auroras, fires, gas flares, and fishing fleets.

This layer is useful for showing patterns of human activity and energy behaviors such as cities and highways, the holiday periods, the tracking of shipping and fishing fleets at night and, the burning of waste natural gas (gas flares) from on and off shore oil/gas production sites.

 

Examples of the VIIRS Nighttime Imagery (Day/Night Band, Enhanced Near Constant Contrast)

 

This layer is updated daily, unlike the VIIRS Earth at Night 2012 image. The 2012 Earth at Night image was an image composite assembled from clear, cloud free images from 9 days in April 2012 and 13 days in October 2012.

The VIIRS Nighttime Imagery (Day/Night Band, Enhanced Near Constant Contrast) layer is available from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the joint NASA/NOAA Suomi National Polar orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP) satellite. The sensor resolution is 750 m at nadir, imagery resolution is scaled to 500 m, temporal resolution is daily and temporal range for viewing in Worldview/Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) is 30 November 2016 - present.

Read more: Bringing Light to the Night: New VIIRS Nighttime Imagery Available through GIBS


 

Happy New Year!

We have been very, very behind with our GIBS blog - we will make a concerted effort this year to ensure that this blog is kept up-to-date and you are wowed by all of our great new additions to GIBS! We also plan to announce any Worldview related updates here as well. Worldview is our web mapping client, powered by GIBS imagery. 

We have A LOT of new imagery up in GIBS (and Worldview) since our last blog post, check it out below!

 

New imagery available in GIBS and Worldview
New imagery available in GIBS (soon to be available in Worldview)
  • Terra/MISR
    • DHR Average (Monthly, Natural Color) (February 2000 - February 2016)
    • Radiance Average (Monthly, Natural Color) (February 2000 - February 2016)
    • Radiance Average (Monthly, Infrared Color) (February 2000 - February 2016)
    • Aerosol Optical Depth Average (Green, Monthly) (February 2000 - August 2016)
    • Land NDVI Average (Monthly) (February 2000 - August 2016)
    • TOA Albedo Average (Red, Monthly) (February 2000 - August 2016)
    • Cloud Stereo Height (No Wind Correction, < 0.5 km, Monthly) (February 2000 - August 2016)
    • Cloud Stereo Height (No Wind Correction, < 1.5 – 2.0 km, Monthly) (February 2000 - August 2016)
  • Terra/MOPITT
    • Carbon Monoxide (Daily, Day, Surface Mixing Ratio) (1 March 2000 - 24 May 2016)
    • Carbon Monoxide (Monthly, Day, Surface Mixing Ratio) (March 2000 - March 2016)
    • Carbon Monoxide (Daily, Night, Surface Mixing Ratio) (1 March 2000 - 24 May 2016)
    • Carbon Monoxide (Monthly, Night, Surface Mixing Ratio) (March 2000 - March 2016)
    • Carbon Monoxide (Daily, Day, Total Column) (1 March 2000 - 24 May 2016)
    • Carbon Monoxide (Monthly, Day Total Column) (March 2000 - Marc 2016)
    • Carbon Monoxide (Daily, Night, Total Column) (1 March 2000 - 24 May 2016)
    • Carbon Monoxide (Monthly, Night, Total Column) (March 2000 - March 2016)
  • Terra/CERES
    • Surface CRE Net Longwave Flux (Monthly) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Longwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Down, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Longwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Down, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Longwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Up, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Longwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Up, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Net Longwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Net Longwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Net Total Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Net Total Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface CRE Net Shortwave Flux (Monthly) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Down, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Down, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Up, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Up, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Net Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface Net Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Surface CRE Net Total Flux (Monthly) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • Incoming Solar Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA CRE Longwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA CRE Net Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA CRE Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA Longwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA Longwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA Net Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA Net Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, All-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Energy Balanced and Filled, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - November 2015)
    • TOA Longwave Flux (Monthly, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - June 2002)
    • TOA Longwave Flux (Monthly, All-Sky) (March 2000 - June 2002)
    • TOA Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - June 2002)
    • TOA Shortwave Flux (Monthly, All-Sky) (March 2000 - June 2002)
    • TOA Window-Region Flux (Monthly, Clear-Sky) (March 2000 - June 2002)
    • TOA Window-Region Flux (Monthly, All-Sky) (March 2000 - June 2002)
  • Terra and Aqua/CERES (July 2002 - February 2016)
    • TOA Longwave Flux (Monthly, Clear-Sky)
    • TOA Longwave Flux (Monthly, All-Sky)
    • TOA Shortwave Flux (Monthly, Clear-Sky)
    • TOA Shortwave Flux (Monthly, All-Sky)
    • TOA Window-Region Flux (Monthly, Clear-Sky)
    • TOA Window-Region Flux (Monthly, All-Sky)
  • Aura/OMI (1 October 2004 - 1 October 2016)
    • Sulfur Dioxide (Planetary Boundary Layer)
    • Aerosol Optical Depth (Absorbing, Multi-Wavelength, 388.0 nm)
    • Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo (Near-UV, 388.0nm)
    • Ozone (DOAS)
    • Ozone (TOMS-Like)
    • Nitric Oxide (Tropospheric Column)
  • Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)/Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) (4 May 1995 - 31 December 2013 composite)
    • Lightning Flashes (Raw)
    • Lightning Flashes (Scaled)
    • Lightning Flash Rate
  • OrbView-1/ OTD (4 May 1995 - 31 December 2013 composite)
    • Lightning Flashes (Raw)
    • Lightning Flashes (Scaled)
    • Lightning Flash Rate
  • TRMM/LIS, OrbView-1/OTD (4 May 1995 - 31 December 2013 composite)
    • Lightning Flash Rate (Combined)
  • Merged Microwave Radiometers
    • Precipitable Water over Ice–Free Oceans (Monthly, Average) (January 1988 - August 2016)
    • Wind Speed over Ice–Free Oceans (Monthly, Average) (January 1988 - August 2016)
  • NIMBUS-7 / SSMR, DMSP 5D-2 F8 / SSMI, DMSP 5D-2 F11 / SSMI, DMSP 5D-2 F13 / SSMI, DMSP 5D-3 F17 / SSMIS
    • Sea Ice Concentration (26 October 1978 - 18 August 1987 / 20 August 1987 - present)
  • ALOS/PALSAR, RADARSAT-1/SAR, TSX/SAR
    • Ice Velocity (Greenland) (3 September 2000; 13 December 2005; 18 December 2006; 1 November 2007; 1 December 2008)
  • ALOS / PALSAR, ENVISAT / ASAR, ERS-1 / SAR, ERS-2 / SAR, RADARSAT-1 / SAR, RADARSAT-2 / SAR
    • Ice Velocity (Antarctica) (1 January 1996)
  • DMSP 5D-2 F13 / SSMI, DMSP 5D-3 F17 / SSMIS, Terra / MODIS
    • Sea Ice and Snow Extent (1 January 1999 - 31 December 2012)
  • Web Enabled Landsat Data (WELD)
    • TOA Reflectance (True Color, Alaska, Annual, V1.5) (December 2002 - December 2011)
    • TOA Reflectance (True Color, Alaska, Monthly, V1.5) (December 2002 - November 2012)
    • TOA Reflectance (True Color, Alaska, Seasonal, V1.5) (December 2002 - September 2012)
    • TOA Reflectance (True Color, CONUS, Annual, V1.5) (December 2002 - December 2011)
    • TOA Reflectance (True Color, CONUS, Monthly, V1.5) (December 2002 - November 2012)
    • TOA Reflectance (True Color, CONUS, Seasonal, V1.5) (December 2002 - September 2012)
    • Surface Reflectance (NBAR, True Color, Global, Annual, V3.0) (December 2008 - December 2010)
    • Surface Reflectance (NBAR, True Color, Global, Monthly, V3.0) (December 2008 - November 2011)
    • Surface Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) (NBAR, Global, Annual, V3.0) (December 2008 - December 2010)
    • Surface Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) (NBAR, Global, Monthly, V3.0) (December 2008 - November 2011)

Visit GIBS Available Imagery Products for more information.

New and improved GIBS

In the Spring of 2016, the GIBS team deployed a new operational system (GIBS 1.0) with superior data storage, performance, and capabilities to the beta system it replaced. The release of GIBS 1.0 allowed for a doubling of its imagery products in 2016, both in number and storage. This has been accomplished along with a reduction in latency for NRT imagery and with a continuation of GIBS’ responsive request performance.  The GIBS team continues to work closely with its user community to define and add new imagery products and features such as sub-daily (e.g., granules), vector-based, and vertical profile data visualizations.

 

The beta version of GIBS was initially released in 2011 enabling visual discovery and comparison of interdisciplinary science parameters by providing full resolution visual representations of NASA Earth science data in a free, open, and interoperable manner. Through responsive and highly available web services, GIBS now provides quick access to over 400 satellite imagery products, covering every part of the world. Many imagery products represent near real-time (NRT) data and are available within three hours after satellite overpass. Other imagery products span the entire science mission, up to 30 years of observation.

New Features in Worldview

Natural Events Tab

This feature was added in collaboration with NASA Earth Observatory’s Natural Event Tracker (EONET). EONET provides a curated list of current natural events and hazards such as wildfires, severe storms and volcanic eruptions. Worldview uses this event list to provide users the ability to easily view pertinent GIBS imagery layers for the date(s) and geographical area of a selected event.

 

Animation

The new animation feature allows users to create, download, and share animations that more easily demonstrate the dynamic processes shown in the imagery.

Push the play button at the bottom/center of the screen here to watch the Yosemite Rim Fire grow in size and change the underlying landscape:

http://go.nasa.gov/2f6JriU

 

Here’s an example showing the calving of iceberg B-31 from Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier:

http://go.nasa.gov/2f7fpOQ

 

 

Polar Rotation

Users are now able to rotate the imagery in the Arctic and Antarctic views. The user now has the power to decide what direction is "up".

Coming soon...

Keep your eyes peeled for new features and improvements in Worldview!

Update on 2016 April 13: generation of Terra / MODIS atmospheric products has now restarted as of 2016 April 8.  Likewise, atmospheric imagery from that date forward is now available in GIBS. See here for full details:

https://ladsweb.nascom.nasa.gov/news/?id=1370

 

Original post from 2016 March 3:

The Terra spacecraft along with its MODIS instrument entered safe mode on 2016 February 18 during an inclination adjustment maneuver (IAM).  It recovered from safe mode into normal mode on February 22 and reentered into science operations on February 24.  Data will therefore be missing between February 18-24.  

Though the data is currently being acquired and processed, the resulting data products are degraded and are not expected to meet science quality due to instrument temperatures not yet reaching their normal operating value.  Most atmosphere products and some land products are disabled.  As of 2016 February 4 000z, land products will resume processing and atmosphere products will resume at a future date.

GIBS imagery products are dependent on these data products and will be produced accordingly.

Please contact support@earthdata.nasa.gov if you have further questions.

 

 

From soil moisture and temperature to snow mass to heterotrophic respiration, 16 new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) layers are now available in GIBS!

See here for all of the layers pre-populated in Worldview with the exception of Freeze/Thaw, which you can view in Arctic Polar Stereographic mode.

The full list of new products is:

  • Soil Moisture (L3, Active)
  • Soil Moisture (L3, Active/Passive)
  • Surface Soil Moisture (L4, 12z Instantaneous)
  • Surface Soil Moisture Uncertainty (L4, 12z Instantaneous)
  • Surface Soil Temperature (L4, 12z Instantaneous)
  • Snow Mass (L4, 12z-3z Average)
  • Gross Primary Production (L4, 9 km Grid Cell Mean)
  • Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4, 12z Instantaneous)
  • Root Zone Soil Moisture Uncertainty (L4, 12z Instantaneous)
  • Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange (L4, 9 km Grid Cell Mean)
  • Heterotrophic Respiration (L4, 9 km Grid Cell Mean)
  • Percent of Potential Vegetation Light Use Efficiency (L4, 9 km Grid Cell Mean)
  • Percent Frozen Area (L4, 9 km Grid Cell Coverage)
  • Disaggregated Brightness Temperature (L3, Active/Passive, H Polarization)
  • Disaggregated Brightness Temperature (L3, Active/Passive, V Polarization)
  • Freeze/Thaw (L3, Active, Arctic Polar Stereographic)

The "Active" and "Active/Passive" products are available from April 15, 2015 through July 7, 2015.  The "L4" products are available from March 31, 2015 through the present and will be available on an ongoing basis.

When we originally open sourced GIBS' tiled imagery storage format and server two years ago, we hoped that it would encourage usage and contributions from those outside of our project.  Originally developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Meta Raster Format (MRF) is a key piece of what allows GIBS to efficiently serve over 200 trillion pixels (and counting!) to thousands of users per day without breaking a sweat.  Today we're happy to report that Esri has contributed a data compression algorithm to the MRF repository called Limited Error Raster Compression (LERC).

LERC is designed to efficiently serve mapping data (as opposed to imagery) such as elevation or temperature values which can then be rapidly retrieved online.  A primary feature of LERC is the ability to tune the size of the data based on the application's needs and the characteristics of the data itself.  It accomplishes this by allowing the data provider to precisely control the amount of error allowed between the original data values and the compressed data values.  This could range somewhere from lossless (i.e., no difference between original and compressed data) and lossy (e.g., 0.1 degree Celsius tolerance for a temperature dataset).  

This compression and decompression is also designed to be fast enough to perform in the browser.  A JavaScript decoder is currently available in the LERC repository.

Esri has contributed this patented code to the MRF repository under an Apache v2.0 open source license for "GIS, terrestrial and extra-terrestrial mapping, and other related earth sciences applications."

While GIBS does not currently serve data using LERC, NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) plans to investigate how GIBS-like access to data could better support its mission.  Besides accessing through standard tile-based retrievals, we imagine it might also gain traction by supporting the use of scripts to rapidly scrape only the data of interest.

We hope that you'll also find some good uses!   Please let us know at support@earthdata.nasa.gov if you do or have questions.

 

GHRSST Oct-Nov 2015

 

We are pleased to announce the availability of two new sea surface temperature layers provided by the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST):

 

 

VIIRS is Here

December 10, 2015 - VIIRS Corrected Reflectance

 

While we love everything that MODIS has done and is still doing after 15+ years (!), we're very excited about the next generation of moderate resolution imagery provided by VIIRS - the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite - on the Suomi-NPP satellite!  GIBS is now providing daily, global mosaics of VIIRS imagery in full resolution.  These include

  • Corrected Reflectance (True Color)
  • Corrected Reflectance (Bands M3-I3-M11)
  • Corrected Reflectance (Bands M11-I2-I1)
  • Fires and Thermal Anomalies (Day, 375m)
  • Fires and Thermal Anomalies (Night, 375m)

 

Check them out in Worldview!  For this initial release, imagery begins on November 24, 2015 and is being produced in an ongoing basis in near real time - the imagery is available within 3-5 hours of acquisition from the satellite with the goal of reducing that latency further.

 

   

VIIRS fires are represented as tiny triangles whereas tiny dots are used for MODIS fires.  The first image above shows VIIRS fires + corrected reflectance with true color bands;  the second, VIIRS fires + corrected reflectance with M11-I2-I1 bands to show burned areas (reddish brown) and through the smoke.

 

  modis-viirs

One of the most visually striking differences between VIIRS and MODIS is that VIIRS has a wider swath which provides full coverage of the globe on a daily basis.  Here is a toggle between Aqua/MODIS and Suomi-NPP/VIIRS from December 7, 2015.  That wider swath does have a tradeoff, though - the maximum spatial resolution of VIIRS is 375 meters per pixel while MODIS is 250 meters per pixel.

 

viirs-arctic   viirs-antarctic

Corrected Reflectance layers are also available in north and south polar stereographic projections.  Don't mind the giant area of darkness at the north pole during this time of year!  Due to the lack of winter sunlight during satellite overpasses, daytime imagery cannot be collected near the pole.

All layers are now available in Worldview, your GDAL-based scripts, your map clients, etc.  We hope you enjoy them as much as we do!  Feel free to contact us at support@earthdata.nasa.gov with questions or comments.

OnEarth on your desktop

We’re pleased to announce the release of OnEarth-Boxes (https://github.com/nasa-gibs/onearth-boxes), a new system that makes it easy to create new virtual machines with pre-configured OnEarth servers for experimentation, education, and development.  OnEarth is the lightweight geospatial imagery server used by GIBS to serve hundreds of products to users across multiple map projections.

Using Packer (http://packer.io) virtual machine image creation software, OnEarth-Boxes creates a ready-to-go CentOS6 VM with OnEarth, the MRF imagery storage format, and their dependencies installed and configured. Build scripts are currently included to make VMWare, VirtualBox, and Vagrant/VirtualBox images.

OnEarth-Boxes also includes some demo imagery, accessible through a simple OpenLayers endpoint. WMTS, TWMS/KML, and Mapserver endpoints are pre-configured. Use OnEarth-Boxes to get a feel for how the software works and what its capabilities are without having to integrate it within an existing system.

Since all the OnEarth/MRF utilities are included, OnEarth-Boxes is a great way to quickly get an instance of OnEarth running in order to experiment with your own imagery. Especially when using Vagrant, it’s easy to import new imagery into the VM via a shared folder, create MRFs, and add new layers to OnEarth.

OnEarth-Boxes is also useful as a sandbox for development with OnEarth or MRF. All the source code is included and linked to the Github repo by default, and all the necessary development utilities for compilation and RPM-building are installed.

The Packer build process is highly customizable and allows for easy, repeatable creation of OnEarth VMs by modifying the build parameters and scripts. The Packer infrastructure includes multiple builders and post-processors for a wide variety of VM environments.

To get started with OnEarth-Boxes, visit https://github.com/nasa-gibs/onearth-boxes.

snow covered mountain range

 

We're pleased to announce the availability of new Global Digital Elevation Models in GIBS from Terra's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM).  These products are available globally at their full resolution of 30 meters per pixel.

The ASTER products were created from approximately 1.5 million scenes (ASTER stereo pair observations) dating back to 2000 and covers land surfaces between 83°N and 83°S.  The SRTM product is based on Space Shuttle Endeavour's STS-99 mission in February 2000 using two radar antennas.

Shown above is the ASTER GDEM Color Shaded Relief layer.  It shows surface elevation as shaded relief in color. Features such as mountains, valleys, plateaus and canyons with steep slopes will appear more rough, while flat areas will appear more smooth. Areas of lower elevation appear darker green, and areas of higher elevation are reds to white. Areas below sea level are a flat grey.

 

Kilimanjaro

The ASTER GDEM Greyscale Shaded Relief layer (above) shows surface elevation as shaded relief in shades of grey.



color index

The SRTM Color Index (above) and ASTER GDEM Color Index layers show land elevation around the world, measured in meters. On the default palette, white indicates the highest elevations, then brown, yellow and greens indicate low elevations.

We hope that you'll find good ways to use these with or without your other favorite NASA science data products.